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Glenn C. Altschuler and Isaac Kramnick

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780801444258

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801444258.001.0001

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Political Engagement, Divestment, and Cornell’s Two-China Policy

Political Engagement, Divestment, and Cornell’s Two-China Policy

Chapter:
(p.323) 9 Political Engagement, Divestment, and Cornell’s Two-China Policy
Source:
Cornell
Author(s):

Glenn C. Altschuler

Isaac Kramnick

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801444258.003.0009

This chapter examines Cornell University's political engagement, divestment, and two-China policy. Political activism over a range of international issues did not vanish during the tenure of Frank H. T. Rhodes. Students and faculty protested against the nuclear arms race, while conservatives became more visible on campus with the help of a newspaper, the Cornell Review. Furthermore, a movement for divestment from South Africa gathered strength on the campus, culminating in the construction of a “shantytown” and mass arrests in 1985 and 1986. This chapter discusses the ways that Rhodes and other Cornell administrators addressed the political engagement of faculty and students. In particular, it considers Rhodes's position regarding “constructive engagement” as well as apartheid and divestment in South Africa. It also looks at the establishment of the Cornell in Washington program.

Keywords:   divestment, Cornell University, two-China policy, political activism, Frank H. T. Rhodes, South Africa, constructive engagement, apartheid, political engagement, Cornell in Washington

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