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Cultivating the MassesModern State Practices and Soviet Socialism, 1914-1939$
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David L. Hoffmann

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780801446290

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801446290.001.0001

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Surveillance and Propaganda

Surveillance and Propaganda

Chapter:
(p.181) 4 Surveillance and Propaganda
Source:
Cultivating the Masses
Author(s):

David L. Hoffmann

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801446290.003.0005

This chapter examines surveillance and propaganda in the Soviet Union aimed at monitoring political opposition and influencing people's consciousness. It first considers how surveillance and propaganda campaigns became a means for the state to monitor and shape popular moods during World War I in the hope of creating self-motivated, conscious citizens. It then discusses some of the surveillance practices implemented by Soviet officials, including censorship and perlustration of letters. It also looks at the Communist Party's political enlightenment program and its efforts to create an ideal of the New Soviet Person that would inhabit a true socialist society envisioned by the state.

Keywords:   surveillance and propaganda, Soviet Union, popular moods, censorship, perlustration of letters, Communist Party, political enlightenment, New Soviet Person

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