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Edmund Burke in AmericaThe Contested Career of the Father of Modern Conservatism$
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Drew Maciag

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780801448959

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801448959.001.0001

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Woodrow Wilson

Woodrow Wilson

Confronting American Maturity

Chapter:
(p.143) Chapter 8 Woodrow Wilson
Source:
Edmund Burke in America
Author(s):

Drew Maciag

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801448959.003.0009

This chapter looks into the career of Woodrow Wilson (1856–1924), especially in comparison to Roosevelt's tenure. Roosevelt and Wilson belonged to opposing political parties and exhibited strikingly different personalities, yet they were much in tune politically. And though Roosevelt retained the more Burkelike sensibility, the American president who outright said the most about Edmund Burke was Wilson himself. His introduction to Burke came early—as a college student he recognized Burke as one of the “greatest and truest” orators. And while Wilson was unable to create his own political opportunities as Roosevelt had done, he made up for it by becoming the foremost political scientist of his generation, and in the process he grew increasingly enamored of Edmund Burke.

Keywords:   Woodrow Wilson, Theodore Roosevelt, political opportunities, political science, orator

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