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The French RepublicHistory, Values, Debates$
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Edward Ducler Berenson, Vincent Duclert, and Christophe Prochasson

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780801449017

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801449017.001.0001

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The Republic and Justice

The Republic and Justice

Chapter:
(p.154) 17 The Republic and Justice
Source:
The French Republic
Author(s):

Paul Jankowski

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801449017.003.0018

This chapter discusses the problem of arbitrariness in justice in the French Republics. Of all the ideals that five French Republics have invoked since 1793, none has caused them more trouble than justice. Each promised to celebrate it; each was accused of subverting it. Hence the chapter considers how they could have placed justice at the service of the people while emancipating it from their government—an issue that still persists to this day. Arbitrariness, the republicans held, had been the besetting sin of monarchical justice. When justice was secret, justice was arbitrary; and it was secret when a regime subtracted it from the light of day and the sovereign gaze of the people.

Keywords:   justice, French Republics, arbitrariness, monarchical justice, sovereignty, French government, arbitrary justice

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