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The French RepublicHistory, Values, Debates$
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Edward Ducler Berenson, Vincent Duclert, and Christophe Prochasson

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780801449017

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801449017.001.0001

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Gender and the Republic

Gender and the Republic

Chapter:
(p.299) 33 Gender and the Republic
Source:
The French Republic
Author(s):

Bonnie G. Smith

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801449017.003.0034

This chapter comments on the legal, economic, political, and other gendered conditions that had constituted women's ambivalent relationship to the Third Republic. Most republics to that date had rested on gendered foundations that articulated male privilege and female inferiority. These foundations proved crucial to the way the Third Republic was experienced and understood, as women's equality on a number of fronts was specifically rejected down to the Republic's demise in World War II. The misogyny and male greed shaping the Third Republic, however, sparked a movement of middle-class women subalterns to change the status quo and make the Republic live up to its rhetoric of rights and equality.

Keywords:   Third Republic, misogyny, male privilege, industrialization, gender, women's equality

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