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The Angola HorrorThe 1867 Train Wreck That Shocked the Nation and Transformed American Railroads$
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Charity Vogel

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780801449086

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801449086.001.0001

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Falling

Falling

Chapter:
(p.92) Chapter 8 Falling
Source:
The Angola Horror
Author(s):

Charity Vogel

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801449086.003.0009

This chapter recounts how the New York Express's last two cars fell into the icy gorge below the Big Sister Creek bridge. Running after the train, James Mahar did not stop to look at what had occurred at the site of the derailment. The frog's curved iron pieces had struck a wheel on the left-hand side of the back truck, throwing the truck off kilter. Passengers on the train could not see what was happening on the rails. How strongly they felt the concussion of the derailment depended on where they sat. The cars of the express then began to shudder as they rolled along the track. Robert J. Dickson, an engineer working for the Buffalo and Erie Railroad, decided to jump from the moving train, which had already traveled 1,230 feet with derailed back wheels.

Keywords:   derailment, New York Express, Big Sister Creek bridge, James Mahar, passengers, Robert J. Dickson

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