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The Angola HorrorThe 1867 Train Wreck That Shocked the Nation and Transformed American Railroads$
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Charity Vogel

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780801449086

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801449086.001.0001

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Mourning

Mourning

Chapter:
(p.162) Chapter 13 Mourning
Source:
The Angola Horror
Author(s):

Charity Vogel

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801449086.003.0014

This chapter focuses on the days of mourning for the victims of the New York Express wreck. The bodies of the Angola dead were hardly cleaned, though no one was able to explain why. As wives, parents, children, and friends slowly filtered into one of the room set aside for the dead, a room full of coffins, gasps and cries could be heard from every corner. But they were not the only ones who wanted to gain entrance to the viewing rooms. Hundreds of people without any connection to the train wreck were also hoping to experience the aftermarth of the tragedy first hand. This chapter also describes the atmosphere during the public funeral for the unnamed victims of the Angola wreck which was held on December 22, 1867 (those bodies were later buried in a Buffalo cemetery).

Keywords:   mourning, victims, New York Express, Angola, dead, coffins, public funeral, train wreck

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