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In Uncertain TimesAmerican Foreign Policy after the Berlin Wall and 9/11$
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Melvyn P. Leffler and Jeffrey W. Legro

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780801449093

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801449093.001.0001

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An Architecture of U.S. Strategy after the Cold War

An Architecture of U.S. Strategy after the Cold War

Chapter:
(p.26) 2 An Architecture of U.S. Strategy after the Cold War
Source:
In Uncertain Times
Author(s):

Robert B. Zoellick

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801449093.003.0002

This chapter examines U.S. strategy and policy at the end of the Cold War, along with political economy dimensions as well as U.S. policies toward the Asia-Pacific and Western Hemisphere. It describes the strategic concept U.S. policymakers sought to advance in 1989, which emphasizes the links between free trade and economic integration on the one hand, and political and security interests on the other. The strategy drew on three existing but changing institutions: the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the European Community (which became the European Union), and the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (now known as the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe). The chapter also considers the strategic shifts and possibilities that occurred in North America and the Western Hemisphere at the end of the Cold War, along with their implications for U.S. foreign policy.

Keywords:   political economy, Asia-Pacific, Western Hemisphere, free trade, economic integration, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Europe, North America, Cold War, foreign policy

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