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Citizen SciencePublic Participation in Environmental Research$
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Janis L. Dickinson and Rick Bonney

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780801449116

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801449116.001.0001

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Developing a Conservation Research Program with Citizen Science

Developing a Conservation Research Program with Citizen Science

Chapter:
(p.139) 9 Developing a Conservation Research Program with Citizen Science
Source:
Citizen Science
Author(s):

Ralph S. Hames

James D. Lowe

Kenneth V. Rosenberg

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801449116.003.0010

This chapter explains how citizen science can be used to develop a conservation research program. It describes a specific case in which “super citizen scientists” used manipulative sampling to gather data implicating acid rain and mercury in forest bird declines, highlighting the advantages of partnerships with governmental and nongovernmental organizations. Focusing on the Birds in Forested Landscapes (BFL) project that was originally developed at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, the chapter demonstrates how citizen data can help address the effects of pollution on birds over wide regions. It also considers the BFL's collaboration with The Nature Conservancy as well as new research using data from another citizen science project, the Breeding Bird Survey, to develop a program for investigating significant conservation issues for birds and for translating science for policy and management.

Keywords:   citizen science, conservation research program, super citizen scientists, Birds in Forested Landscapes, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, pollution, birds, The Nature Conservancy, Breeding Bird Survey, conservation

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