Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Aversion and ErasureThe Fate of the Victim After the Holocaust$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Carolyn J. Dean

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780801449444

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801449444.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.178) Epilogue
Source:
Aversion and Erasure
Author(s):

Carolyn J. Dean

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801449444.003.0006

This chapter summarizes key themes and presents some final thoughts. This book has focused on critics' effort to return to an empirical history of injury deemed overwhelmed by memory, itself related to the iconic and thus ahistorical status granted Auschwitz and, by proxy, Jewish memory. The status of Auschwitz as an icon of evil in our time has generated the evacuation of historical in favor of the moral content of suffering that leads to the peculiar concept of “too much” memory. This pervasive reference to “excessive” or “surfeit” memory is the most problematic figuration of victims' demands for recognition. The concept of surfeit memory should be recast and envisioned properly as a transformation of victims into aggressors who threaten the tranquility of those whose memories are acknowledged.

Keywords:   victim culture, Jewish memory, Holocaust, Auschwitz, suffering, surfeit memory

Cornell Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.