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Between Two MotherlandsNationality and Emigration among the Greeks of Bulgaria, 1900-1949$
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Theodora Dragostinova

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780801449451

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801449451.001.0001

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People on the Margins, 1931–1941

People on the Margins, 1931–1941

Chapter:
(p.193) 6 People on the Margins, 1931–1941
Source:
Between Two Motherlands
Author(s):

Theodora Dragostinova

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801449451.003.0007

This chapter discusses the directive issued by the county police chief prohibiting the use of “foreign languages, especially Greek and Turkish, in all state, county, and public offices,” in Pomorie. Even though this decision triggered steadfast objections of Greek diplomats and firm interventions of the Bulgarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the chief argued that speaking foreign languages “undermine[d] the national feeling of every Bulgarian … [and] g[ave] reasons to think that Anhialo and its district were a foreign province that d[id] not belong to the Kingdom of Bulgaria.” His statement demonstrated that, in the 1930s, local officials had continued to view the Greek population in their areas as a potentially dangerous foreign element.

Keywords:   foreign languages, Greek, Turkish, Bulgaria, Greek population, foreign element

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