Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Lovesick JapanSex * Marriage * Romance * Law$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Mark D. West

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780801449475

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801449475.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM Cornell University Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.cornell.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Cornell University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in Cornell for personal use (for details see www.cornell.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy/privacy-policy-and-legal-notice).date: 18 October 2018

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.209) Conclusion
Source:
Lovesick Japan
Author(s):

Mark D. West

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801449475.003.0007

This concluding chapter summarizes key findings about Japanese judges' views about love, sex, and marriage, highlighting the lack of separation of love from law. It argues that judicial opinions are part of a complicated legal system where courts reach far more deeply into hearts and psyches than statutes require. Courts view the marital relationship not simply as a contract between two people but as a family bond the dissolution of which can be affected by statements of adult children. Courts have much to say about sex, voicing opinions as to which activities are normal and which are decidedly not. And love, which seems unlikely to have legal importance, is often an explicit or implicit factor in decision making.

Keywords:   Japanese judges, love, pain, judicial opinions, sex, marriage, Japanese law

Cornell Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.