Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
We Will Be Satisfied With Nothing LessThe African American Struggle for Equal Rights in the North during Reconstruction$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Hugh Davis

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780801450099

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801450099.001.0001

Show Summary Details

The Republican Retreat from Reconstruction

The Republican Retreat from Reconstruction

Chapter:
(p.133) 5 The Republican Retreat from Reconstruction
Source:
We Will Be Satisfied With Nothing Less
Author(s):

Hugh Davis

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801450099.003.0005

This chapter considers the response of northern blacks to the collapse of Reconstruction in the South and tells the story of their ongoing efforts to gain equal rights into the 1880s. The election of Rutherford B. Hayes as president in 1877 signaled the demise of the Reconstruction. His southern policies allowed Southern officials to manage the region's domestic affairs without the threat of federal intervention. The Democrats were committed to dismantling the Republican governments, reducing the political power of blacks, and reshaping the South's legal system for the purpose of establishing labor control and racial subordination. From the 1860s to the 1880s, the campaign waged by northern blacks against segregation within, and exclusion from, the public schools produced impressive results in numerous northern states. In the 1880s they vigorously responded to the U.S. Supreme Court's evisceration of the Civil Rights Act of 1875 by convincing a majority of northern state legislatures to enact far-reaching civil rights laws.

Keywords:   northern blacks, African Americans, Reconstruction, equal rights, Rutherford B. Hayes, civil rights

Cornell Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.