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No Family Is an IslandCultural Expertise among Samoans in Diaspora$
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Ilana Gershon

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780801450785

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801450785.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.165) Conclusion
Source:
No Family Is an Island
Author(s):

Ilana Gershon

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801450785.003.0008

This concluding chapter summarizes the book's main themes. It discusses how being Samoan in New Zealand and the United States means being a culture-bearer; Samoan migrants' social mobility and their navigation of changing government bureaucracies; how the governments of New Zealand and U.S. use culture as justification for increasing the decentralization and privatization of government services; the ways people are social analysts in their own right; and how their social analysis shaped how they engaged with what they understood to be culture and what other people understood to be culture. This book also suggests analytical techniques for addressing the problem of how people navigate contexts in which multiple social orders exist simultaneously. These techniques are a testament to the creativity and sophistication of people navigating social orders only minimally of their own making.

Keywords:   Samoans, Samoan migrants, culture, social orders, New Zealand, United States

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