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The Politics of Voter SuppressionDefending and Expanding Americans' Right to Vote$
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Tova Andrea Wang

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780801450853

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801450853.001.0001

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Epilogue

Epilogue

What Citizens Can Do

Chapter:
(p.156) Epilogue
Source:
The Politics of Voter Suppression
Author(s):

Tova Andrea Wang

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801450853.003.0010

This chapter argues that more action needs to be taken against vote suppression. Individual citizens have a role to play, and efforts on the part of persons and groups are often effective in the struggle for voter inclusion. A place for someone to start is to join one of the local, state, and national organizations working on these issues, many of which are planning efforts to help individual citizens obtain required ID and other documentation. Signing petitions in the support of the repeal of restrictive laws or starting a petition drive is another positive action. Showing up at public hearings conducted by state legislators and making one's voice heard is a democratic right open to anyone, and in some cases it is possible to submit testimony to legislative bodies. Joining national efforts to protect voting rights is another way to support voter participation. Election Protection—a coalition of voting, civil, and human rights organizations—was started in 2004 to help voters at the polls throughout the US. By means of phone hotlines and the quick deployment of volunteers to poll sites, Election Protection monitors and reports any problems voters might be having, especially those that might be of a systematic nature.

Keywords:   voting rights, voter exclusion, disenfranchisement, voting participation, Election Protection

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