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To Follow in Their FootstepsThe Crusades and Family Memory in the High Middle Ages$
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Nicholas L. Paul

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780801450976

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801450976.001.0001

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Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.295) Epilogue
Source:
To Follow in Their Footsteps
Author(s):

Nicholas L. Paul

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801450976.003.0010

This epilogue discusses the apparent endurance of crusading enthusiasm in the families of King Henry II of England and King Alfonso II of Aragón at the dawning of the thirteenth century. More specifically, it considers how the nobility remained the lifeblood of the crusade movement long after royal governments and broader Christian society deened crusades to be impracticable and undesirable. Both Alfonso and Henry received appeals from within their lands and from outside to lead crusades. In those appeals, their crusading ancestry played a central role. However, the two men died without having acquitted themselves of the crusading responsibilities that were seen as incumbent on them. The chapter also examines some of the changes in crusading practices, including the end of the age of the great dynastic narrative works devoted to the lineage of noble families after the first quarter of the thirteenth century. Finally, it takes note of the fact that the mechanisms developed by noble families—the vibrant, living traditions based on storytelling and crusading memorabilia—continued.

Keywords:   crusading, King Henry II, King Alfonso II, nobility, crusades, ancestry, noble families, crusading memorabilia

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