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That the People Might LiveLoss and Renewal in Native American Elegy$

Arnold Krupat

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780801451386

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801451386.001.0001

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(p.213) Works Cited

(p.213) Works Cited

Source:
That the People Might Live
Publisher:
Cornell University Press

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