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Redemption and RevolutionAmerican and Chinese New Women in the Early Twentieth Century$
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Motoe Sasaki

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780801451393

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801451393.001.0001

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Lost in the Paradigm of World History

Lost in the Paradigm of World History

Chapter:
(p.161) Epilogue: Lost in the Paradigm of World History
Source:
Redemption and Revolution
Author(s):

Motoe Sasaki

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801451393.003.0007

This chapter discusses the eventual repatriation of American New Women missionaries. After they returned to the United States, many of them felt lost in their own country. There was also a profound difference between the views of returning American New Women missionaries and the general American public about the United States' role in world history. The chapter also raises the important question of how and why the experiences of New Women in both the United States and China fell into oblivion in the post-World War II era. The erasure of their experiences from public memory suggests that the politics of world history has not relaxed its grip on shaping global relations in a unipolar, bipolar, or even multipolar world.

Keywords:   American New Women missionaries, United States, China, world history

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