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Wines of Eastern North AmericaFrom Prohibition to the Present-A History and Desk Reference$
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Hudson Cattell

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780801451980

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801451980.001.0001

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Philip Wagner and the Arrival of the French Hybrids

Philip Wagner and the Arrival of the French Hybrids

Chapter:
(p.24) Chapter Two Philip Wagner and the Arrival of the French Hybrids
Source:
Wines of Eastern North America
Author(s):

Hudson Cattell

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801451980.003.0003

This chapter examines Philip Wagner's role in establishing the modern eastern wine industry. Throughout his life, Wagner actively sought out the latest information on grape growing, grape varieties, and winemaking from libraries, research stations, scientists, and anyone who had more experience than himself. From 1932 on, he kept detailed records of how he made all his wines. By this time, he had found references in his early reading to grapes grown in France known as the hybrides producteurs directes (HPD), or “hybrid direct producers.” This is what the French hybrids were called in those days because they could be grown on their own roots rather than having to be grafted.

Keywords:   Philip Wagner, eastern wine industry, grape growing, grape varieties, winemaking, hybrid direct producers, French hybrids

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