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Making Good NeighborsCivil Rights, Liberalism, and Integration in Postwar Philadelphia$
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Abigail Perkiss

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780801452284

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801452284.001.0001

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“Well-Trained Citizens and Good Neighbors”

“Well-Trained Citizens and Good Neighbors”

Educating an Integrated America

Chapter:
(p.90) Chapter 5 “Well-Trained Citizens and Good Neighbors”
Source:
Making Good Neighbors
Author(s):

Abigail Perkiss

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801452284.003.0006

This chapter traces the West Mount Airy Neighbors Association (WMAN)'s efforts toward the integration program, particularly on how they had solved whites' complaints on the growing number of black students in one of the neighborhood's public schools, Henry School. WMAN focused organizational resources on enticing individual families to send their children to this school. They relied on coordinated collaboration with governmental agencies and institutions to achieve educational stability. In conjunction, the Henry Home and School Association (HHSA) implemented programming designed to bring neighborhood families, black and white alike, into the schools. They called on parents to donate time, money, and skills to draw the community together.

Keywords:   WMAN, public schools, parents, educational stability, parents, black student

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