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After NewspeakLanguage Culture and Politics in Russia from Gorbachev to Putin$
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Michael S. Gorham

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780801452628

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801452628.001.0001

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“Cyber Curtain” or Glasnost 2.0?

“Cyber Curtain” or Glasnost 2.0?

Strategies for Web-based Communication in the New Media Age

Chapter:
(p.166) 6 “Cyber Curtain” or Glasnost 2.0?
Source:
After Newspeak
Author(s):

Michael S. Gorham

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801452628.003.0007

This chapter looks at the impact of the rapid spread of the Internet and new media technologies on the language culture of Russia today. In stark opposition to efforts to use language and new media to create more of an international presence, trends in national language policy point to the belated attempt to construct what some have called an “electronic” or “cyber curtain”—a net-based space featuring all-Cyrillic interfaces, swift and affordable access, state-operated mail services and search engines, and content that is likewise limited and controlled by the state. However, as a medium that was meant to break down national borders and foster free, democratic modes of communication, the Internet has served as a political game changer in ways that counter Putin's desire to control technologies of communication.

Keywords:   Internet, new media, Russian language, language policy, cyber curtain, democratic communication, communication technologies

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