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For God and GlobeChristian Internationalism in the United States between the Great War and the Cold War$
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Michael G. Thompson

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780801452727

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801452727.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Missionaries, Mainliners, and the Making of a Movement

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
For God and Globe
Author(s):

Michael G. Thompson

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801452727.003.0001

This introductory chapter provides a background of Christian internationalism. In the 1920s and 1930s, Christian internationalism in the United States was characterized by three factors. First, as a movement of thought, it consisted in large part in the proliferation of new enterprises devoted to producing Christian reflection on the ethics of “international relations”—world conferences, traveling seminars like evangelist Sherwood Eddy's, new forms of print and periodical culture, and ecumenical study commissions. A second defining characteristic of Christian internationalism in the interwar period was its distinct structure of thinking that held Christian universalism to be a check against nationalism rather than a help for it. Last, interwar Christian internationalism consisted of a holistic, oppositional, and at times radical political orientation that in many enterprises actually united realists and pacifists, setting them apart from their legalist and institutionalist counterparts.

Keywords:   Christian internationalism, international relations, Sherwood Eddy, Christian universalism, nationalism

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