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A Tremendous ThingFriendship from the "Iliad" to the Internet$
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Gregory Jusdanis

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780801452840

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801452840.001.0001

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Digital Friends

Digital Friends

Chapter:
(p.156) Afterword Digital Friends
Source:
A Tremendous Thing
Author(s):

Gregory Jusdanis

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801452840.003.0006

This concluding chapter looks at what social networking has to say about friendship and what friendship has to say about social networking. It explains that friendship did not disappear in modernity, as some sociologists had feared, but new manifestations of friendship had simply emerged. The Internet is opening new associations, while also undermining the possibility of old-fashioned, Montaignean intimacy. At the same time, friendship, which inaugurated humanity's literary odyssey, has become the emblem for digital relations, turning our time into the age of homo amicus. We are all bound by an electronically enabled but humanly generated need for empathy—which means that the more we are connected the more literary we are becoming.

Keywords:   social networking, Internet, digital relations, modern friendships, literature

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