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Against Immediate EvilAmerican Internationalists and the Four Freedoms on the Eve of World War II$
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Andrew Johnstone

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780801453250

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801453250.001.0001

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The Sino-Japanese War and the American Committee for Non-Participation in Japanese Aggression

The Sino-Japanese War and the American Committee for Non-Participation in Japanese Aggression

Chapter:
(p.17) Chapter 1 The Sino-Japanese War and the American Committee for Non-Participation in Japanese Aggression
Source:
Against Immediate Evil
Author(s):

Andrew Johnstone

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801453250.003.0002

The outbreak of Sino-Japanese War in July 1937 had limited impact on the American people. The American response to the war was in line with the non-interventionist outlook that had characterized American opinion since the rejection of the League of Nations in 1920. However, a minority of Americans were increasingly concerned with events in China. Displaying a clear sympathy with China, they felt the United States was not doing enough to help the victim of aggression. Frustrated with the lack of a quarantine or economic sanctions against Japan, those who were sympathetic to China felt not only that aid to China must continue but also that the United States needed to stop providing material to Japan. In doing so, it was arguably supporting Japanese aggression. This chapter discusses the formation of the American Committee for Non-Participation in Japanese Aggression (ACNPJA). The ACNPJA called for an embargo and educated the public about the nature of America's role in aiding Japan until 1941.

Keywords:   Sino-Japanese War, China, Japan, non-interventionism, United States, American Committee for Non-Participation in Japanese Aggression, foreign relations, foreign policy, American internationalists

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