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Against Immediate EvilAmerican Internationalists and the Four Freedoms on the Eve of World War II$
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Andrew Johnstone

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780801453250

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801453250.001.0001

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Epilogue

Epilogue

War and Beyond

Chapter:
(p.173) Epilogue
Source:
Against Immediate Evil
Author(s):

Andrew Johnstone

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801453250.003.0010

This epilogue assesses the significance of the organized internationalist movement. It suggests that the greatest public impact of the internationalist organizations came from the Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies (CDAAA). The American Union for Concerted Peace Efforts (AUCPE) gave the collective security movement a more immediate focus; the Non-Partisan Committee for Peace through Revision of the Neutrality Law (NPC) then offered a test case of what could be done by mobilizing opinion behind a key legislative issue. The CDAAA built upon that experience, and from its creation in May 1940 through the heated debate over Lend-Lease, it successfully reflected the majority of popular opinion that desired greater aid to Britain short of American involvement in war. The chapter also argues that the fact that Americans had turned their backs on non-interventionism by 1945 indicates that the internationalist movement had been a success, and in many respects it was. Isolationism as it was known before the war was all but dead.

Keywords:   United States, foreign policy, non-interventionism, internationalist movement, American internationalism, Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies, isolationism

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