Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Imagining Religious Leadership in the Middle AgesRichard of Saint-Vanne and the Politics of Reform$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Steven Vanderputten

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780801453779

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801453779.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM Cornell University Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.cornell.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Cornell University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in Cornell for personal use (for details see www.cornell.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy/privacy-policy-and-legal-notice).date: 15 December 2018

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.160) Conclusion
Source:
Imagining Religious Leadership in the Middle Ages
Author(s):

Steven Vanderputten

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801453779.003.0007

This concluding chapter argues that scholars have continued to rely on classic notions of monastic reform, monastic networking, and abbatial leadership to justify Richard's relevance to the development of Benedictine monasticism. However, the book shows that his stature as a great “apostle of reform” is doubtful, and that he did not initiate a true reform movement. The fundamental problem underlying the scholars' marginalized evaluations of Richard's life is that their reconstruction of his motivations and achievements is based on his identity as monk and abbot. In contrast, Richard's thinking was crucially shaped in an environment that, although inspired by monastic modes of thinking, aimed to impact primarily the ideology and practice of clerical and secular rulers.

Keywords:   Benedictine monasticism, monk, abbot, monastic modes, secular rulers, Richard of Saint-Vanne

Cornell Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.