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Everyone CountsCould "Participatory Budgeting" Change Democracy?$
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Josh Lerner

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780801456657

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801456657.001.0001

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Stepping Up

Stepping Up

Chapter:
(p.43) Stepping Up
Source:
Everyone Counts
Author(s):

Josh Lerner

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801456657.003.0007

This chapter discusses how in the US, the number of participatory budgeting (PB) participants and dollars allocated has roughly doubled each year since 2011. PB is also being considered for a growing range of budgets, including for districts, cities, school districts, universities, housing authorities, agencies, court settlements, community benefits agreements, and even community grants from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development. Since launching Joe Moore's process in 2009, PB has been brought to forty communities across the country. Democratic innovation is evident through people organizing public forums, writing to their elected officials, sharing videos and materials with friends, and meeting with school and university administrators.

Keywords:   participatory budgeting, PBP, housing authorities, court settlements, community benefits agreements, Department of Housing and Urban Development, democracy

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