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The Diplomacy of MigrationTransnational Lives and the Making of U.S.-Chinese Relations in the Cold War$
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Meredith Oyen

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781501700149

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501700149.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

The Floating Population and Foreign Policy

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
The Diplomacy of Migration
Author(s):

Meredith Oyen

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501700149.003.0001

This book examines the interconnections among human migration, foreign policy, and national security by focusing on U.S.-China relations during the Cold War. It discusses the role played by “migration diplomacy”—the process of using migration policy for diplomatic ends—in managing the larger, complex relations between China and the United States in the period from 1943 to 1972. It explores three uses of migration diplomacy that emerged during this period: as a direct tool of foreign policy, as a form of public diplomacy, and as a means to remake the Chinese American community in ways that both the U.S. and Chinese governments sought. Part 1 of the book considers the role of migration policies in fighting World War II and contributing to the advance of the Cold War in Asia. Part 2 shows how Chinese migrants acted as “cold warriors”—influencing international relations both voluntarily and involuntarily. Part 3 explains how migration policy became an instrument for easing the Cold War tensions in Asia.

Keywords:   migration, national security, U.S.-China relations, Cold War, migration diplomacy, migration policy, foreign policy, public diplomacy, Chinese migrants

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