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Euripides’s Revolution under CoverAn Essay$
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Pietro Pucci

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781501700613

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501700613.001.0001

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Polyneices’s Truth

Polyneices’s Truth

Chapter:
5. Polyneices’s Truth
Source:
Euripides’s Revolution under Cover
Author(s):

Pietro Pucci

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501700613.003.0005

This chapter discusses a problematic example of sophia provided by Polyneices in Phoenician Women. More specifically, it examines Polyneices's debate with Eteocles in which he contrasts “justice” and “truth” with a connotation of sophia. Polyneices, like the speaker in a fragment from the Antiope, envisions and elaborates the structure of two conflicting logoi and specifies their formal characteristics (one is simple, and the other complex) and their respective themes (truth and untruth, justice and injustice). The purpose of his argument is to assert—against the sophistic frame of the dissoi logoi—the unswerving essence of truth. This chapter contends that Polyneices's argument has been doctored by a good rhetoric that is reminiscent of sophistic language and strategies.

Keywords:   sophia, Phoenician Women, justice, truth, dissoi logoi, rhetoric, Polyneices, Eteocles

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