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Euripides’s Revolution under CoverAn Essay$
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Pietro Pucci

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781501700613

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501700613.001.0001

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Female Victims of War: The Troades

Female Victims of War: The Troades

Chapter:
12. Female Victims of War: The Troades
Source:
Euripides’s Revolution under Cover
Author(s):

Pietro Pucci

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501700613.003.0012

This chapter focuses on Euripides's female victims of war in Troades. The dispossession of the self is a physical and graphic reality for captured slaves and raped queens in Euripides's poetics, for his world is a cruel one; in it women face gruesome destinies. Young girls are often sacrified for the fatherland or the family or even on the whim of a dead hero. Euripides demands pity from the audience for violence that has no motivation. The sudden or unexpected fall from prosperity, happiness, and wealth to poverty, misery, and destitution is a dominant theme in Euripides's poetry. This chapter examines the lament of enslaved Trojan women in Troades and how chance and slavery join the violence of Eros to perfect Euripides's world of endless victims, grief, and nonsense.

Keywords:   female war victims, Troades, slaves, Euripides, women, violence, lament, slavery, Eros

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