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If God Meant to InterfereAmerican Literature and the Rise of the Christian Right$
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Christopher Douglas

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781501702112

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501702112.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Politics, Literature, Method

Chapter:
(p.280) Conclusion
Source:
If God Meant to Interfere
Author(s):

Christopher Douglas

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501702112.003.0010

This concluding chapter recounts Harold Pinter's speech after receiving the Nobel Prize for Literature on December 7, 2005. He provides a remarkable distinction between the realms of art and the real, entailing the practical repudiation of his edgy postmodern doctrine of an almost half-century before. His distinction between truth-telling and lying could not capture the complex sifting and crafting of information during the buildup to Iraq war. That more complex relation between language and the real was suggested most baldly in journalist Ron Suskind's story in a summer 2002 interview with a “senior adviser to Bush,” Karl Rove. He said that people are now “in the reality-based community,” which he defined as people who “believe that solutions emerge from your judicious study of discernible reality.”

Keywords:   Harold Pinter, art, real, postmodern doctrine, Ron Suskind, Karl Rove

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