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Our Unions, Our SelvesThe Rise of Feminist Labor Unions in Japan$
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Anne Zacharias-Walsh

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781501703041

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501703041.001.0001

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First, We Drink Tea

First, We Drink Tea

Chapter:
(p.57) 4 First, We Drink Tea
Source:
Our Unions, Our Selves
Author(s):

Anne Zacharias-Walsh

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501703041.003.0005

This chapter focuses on the lessons and insights gained from the first phase of the US–Japan Working Women's Networks Project, showing how participants from both sides laid the intellectual groundwork necessary for engaging in meaningful problem solving. It recounts the first face-to-face international meeting in Detroit on September 24–25, 2004, when each of the participating women's groups introduced themselves at a fairly broad level: who they are, how their organizations came about, what they hope to accomplish and by what means. It explains the purpose and format of the meeting and presents the views of scholars from both Japan and the United States about the social, economic, and legal contexts in which the participating women's unions and organizations operate. In particular, it looks at Dorothy Sue Cobble's talk on the history of U.S. labor feminism. There are also discussions by representatives from women's organizations such as the Coalition of Labor Union Women, Kansai Women's Union, and Working Women's Voices.

Keywords:   women's organizations, US-Japan Working Women's Networks Project, Japan, United States, Dorothy Sue Cobble, labor feminism, Coalition of Labor Union Women, Kansai Women's Union, Working Women's Voices, women's unions

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