Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
CounterpreservationArchitectural Decay in Berlin Since 1989$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Daniela Sandler

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781501703164

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501703164.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Living Projects

Living Projects

Collective Housing, Alternative Culture, and Spaces of Resistance

Chapter:
(p.47) 2 Living Projects
Source:
Counterpreservation
Author(s):

Daniela Sandler

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501703164.003.0003

This chapter focuses on Hausprojekte, or “living projects.” Hausprojekte are the most prolific category of counterpreservation, in terms of number of examples. They embrace and deploy architectural decay for sociopolitical goals related to affordable housing, diversity, and personal experimentation. In this chapter, Hausprojekte are examined through the focused discussion of two case studies: the KA 86 and Tuntenhaus (both in the same building), and the Køpi. It considers both Hausprojekte in the plural—as a broad social movement that illuminates important aspects of counterpreservation—and the singularity of each case study. The chapter also aims to highlight the roles these case studies play in shaping urban spaces and debates.

Keywords:   Hausprojekte, living projects, architectural decay, alternative culture, collective housing, KA 86, Tuntenhaus, Køpi, urban spaces

Cornell Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.