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Saving Our CitiesA Progressive Plan to Transform Urban America$
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William W. Goldsmith

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781501704314

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501704314.001.0001

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The Paradox of Plenty

The Paradox of Plenty

Chapter:
(p.121) 5 The Paradox of Plenty
Source:
Saving Our Cities
Author(s):

William W. Goldsmith

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501704314.003.0006

This chapter explores food and nutrition policy. To add food and nutrition as elements of urban policy breaks a supposedly natural boundary. Food and nutrition policy have long been thought to be subjects not for cities, but for departments of agriculture, health authorities, and regulators of large corporations. Yet it is highly appropriate to add food and nutrition as elements of urban policy. Indeed, food and nutrition come into the picture as one of the “external” or “upstream” urban policies in need of improvement, demanding attention to the ways nutritional deficits vary from neighborhood to neighborhood. The problem of food insecurity troubles the poorest neighborhoods.

Keywords:   food and nutrition policy, urban policy, nutritional deficits, food insecurity

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