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Imagining a Greater GermanyRepublican Nationalism and the Idea of Anschluss$
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Erin R. Hochman

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781501704444

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501704444.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.237) Conclusion
Source:
Imagining a Greater Germany
Author(s):

Erin R. Hochman

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501704444.003.0008

This concluding chapter discusses the subsequent Nazi appropriation of the Anschluss and briefly recounts the differences between the republican and Nazi ideas about an Anschluss and nationalism. It expands on the republican use of großdeutsch nationalism: in allowing diverse groups to participate in a national community that was compatible with a democratic and pluralistic society, großdeutsch nationalism became a critical aspect in republicans' energetic attempts to legitimize the embattled republics. While it is true that republicans on both sides of the Austro-German border were never able to convince the political right that they were loyal Germans or that parliamentary democracy was a German form of government, the chapter argues that their inability to do so does not mean that their attempts to create a democratic and peaceful großdeutsch nationalism should be dismissed.

Keywords:   großdeutsch nationalism, Nazism, republicans, German government, German nationalism, Anschluss

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