Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
On Roman ReligionLived Religion and the Individual in Ancient Rome$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jörg Rüpke

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781501704703

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9781501704703.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Religious Communication

Religious Communication

Chapter:
(p.121) 7 Religious Communication
Source:
On Roman Religion
Author(s):

Jörg Rüpke

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9781501704703.003.0008

This chapter examines the notion of “religious communication.” Religious communication is special in its insistence on its vertical dimension, which at the same time allows for very specific and often highly visible horizontal, interhuman communication. Indeed, it is a communication that refers to or directly addresses agents who are frequently, but not inevitably, personalized and who are not within the circle of those who are unquestionably present or relevant to a given situation. These were superhuman agents, or perhaps formerly alive but now dead human agents. The human actor who introduced such agents and chose this mode of action, enlarged her or his own agency, either by forging an alliance with the divine or by reducing the agency of other human actors as a result of the superior capacities of the gods in determining a course of events.

Keywords:   religious communication, interhuman communication, superhuman agents, gods

Cornell Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.