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Queen of VaudevilleThe Story of Eva Tanguay$
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Andrew L. Erdman

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780801449703

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801449703.001.0001

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The Sambo Girl in New York

The Sambo Girl in New York

Chapter:
(p.47) 2 The Sambo Girl in New York
Source:
Queen of Vaudeville
Author(s):

Andrew L. Erdman

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801449703.003.0003

This chapter narrates how Eva Tanguay moved up the professional ladder from itinerant performer to supporting player. In the Broadway show, My Lady, Eva considered each of her fellow chorus as someone encroaching on her spotlight. She expressed this animosity by making her own rendition of her character's song and adding some quirky dance steps. When the show—which later premiered in New York in January 1901 at the Columbia Theatre—began its preliminary out-of-town trial in Boston, Eva, who then became a supporting player by the character of Lotta Faust, allured a number of love-struck “rah-rah boys” from Harvard. After the burlesque closed, Eva was given another opportunity to cast in The Chaperons, which gave her the chance to establish a libidinal connection with her audience through the “Sambo” number.

Keywords:   Eva Tanguay, My Lady, Lotta Faust, The Chaperons, burlesque, Broadway, Sambo

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