Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
From Iron Rice Bowl to InformalizationMarkets, Workers, and the State in a Changing China$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Sarosh Kuruvilla, Ching Kwan Lee, and Mary E. Gallagher

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780801450242

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801450242.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM Cornell University Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.cornell.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Cornell University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in Cornell for personal use. date: 01 August 2021

The Paradox of Labor Force Dualism and State-Labor-Capital Relations in the Chinese Automobile Industry

The Paradox of Labor Force Dualism and State-Labor-Capital Relations in the Chinese Automobile Industry

Chapter:
(p.107) Chapter 6 The Paradox of Labor Force Dualism and State-Labor-Capital Relations in the Chinese Automobile Industry
Source:
From Iron Rice Bowl to Informalization
Author(s):

Lu Zhang

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801450242.003.0006

This chapter presents an in-depth case study of China's automobile industry. It argues that growing competition has forced Chinese automakers to establish a leaner and meaner workplace to cut costs and increase staff flexibility. They have done so by replacing permanent and long-term workers with young, urban-bred, formal contract workers under renewable short-term labor contracts. At the same time, more and more automakers have introduced labor force dualism by deploying a large number of temporary workers (hired through labor dispatch agencies) alongside the formal workers on assembly lines but subjecting them to different treatment. The remainder of the chapter offers an in-depth discussion of this process of industrial restructuring, changing workplace, and transformation of production workforce in the automobile industry since the mid-1990s.

Keywords:   Chinese automobile industry, industry restructuring, automotive industry workers, labor inequality, labor market

Cornell Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.