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Empire of LanguageToward a Critique of (Post) colonial Expression$
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Laurent Dubreuil

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780801450563

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801450563.001.0001

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Interdiction within Diction

Interdiction within Diction

Chapter:
(p.102) Chapter 5 Interdiction within Diction
Source:
Empire of Language
Author(s):

Laurent Dubreuil

, David Fieni
Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801450563.003.0006

This chapter examines how a modification in the practice of French becomes fused with all the uncertainties and limits concerning linguistic transmission. The polemics about the teaching of French, the gaps in school enrollment rates, and the celebration of the apprenticeship in language are tied to a concretization in the language itself. Colonial usage was spread by newspapers, songs, books, and teachers, which operated by and large independently of political changes. Modern censure would thus prohibit the extraordinary from happening by programming the indigene's French, in which the options were to speak either pidgin French or the language of the whites, and by determining a structural deafness to the indigene's French.

Keywords:   linguistic transmission, indigenous French, modern censure, political changes, teaching French, indigenous speech

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