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Borders among ActivistsInternational NGOs in the United States, Britain, and France$
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Sarah S. Stroup

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780801450730

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801450730.001.0001

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Human Rights INGOs

Human Rights INGOs

Chapter:
(p.135) 3 Human Rights INGOs
Source:
Borders among Activists
Author(s):

Sarah S. Stroup

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801450730.003.0004

This chapter presents how the national origin of human rights international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) acts as a more specific source of constraint and opportunity. It also argues that the international human rights sector is different in at least four ways from that of humanitarian relief. First, the sector is dominated globally by Amnesty International, whose combined international income is almost eight times larger than that of the next largest INGO, Human Rights Watch. Second, human rights INGOs are fewer in number and smaller in size than in the humanitarian sector. Third, many human rights nongovernment organization worldwide have been created and sustained by contributions from American grant-making foundations. Lastly, human rights INGOs are in general much more involved in advocacy and political action than their humanitarian counterparts.

Keywords:   international nongovernmental organizations, human rights, humanitarian relief, Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International

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