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Atomic AssistanceHow "Atoms for Peace" Programs Cause Nuclear Insecurity$
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Matthew Fuhrmann

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780801450907

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801450907.001.0001

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Economic Statecraft and Atoms for Peace

Economic Statecraft and Atoms for Peace

A Theory of Peaceful Nuclear Assistance

Chapter:
(p.33) Chapter 2 Economic Statecraft and Atoms for Peace
Source:
Atomic Assistance
Author(s):

Matthew Fuhrmann

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801450907.003.0003

This chapter examines how peaceful nuclear assistance to other states is used by nuclear weapons suppliers as a tool of economic statecraft to influence the behavior of their friends and adversaries. It discusses three main politico-strategic reasons why suppliers engage in peaceful nuclear cooperation: to keep their allies and alliances strong; to constrain their enemies; and to prop up democracies in the international system. It also considers three alternative explanations for peaceful nuclear assistance: countries use atomic assistance to strengthen nonproliferation norms; countries sell nuclear technology to make money; countries offer nuclear assistance to sustain their domestic nuclear industries (for example, suppliers with lower domestic demand for nuclear energy are more likely to provide nuclear assistance than states with a high domestic demand for nuclear energy).

Keywords:   peaceful nuclear assistance, nuclear weapons suppliers, economic statecraft, peaceful nuclear cooperation, alliances, enemies, democracies, nonproliferation, nuclear technology, nuclear industries

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