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Spoils of TruceCorruption and State-Building in Postwar Lebanon$
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Reinoud Leenders

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780801451003

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801451003.001.0001

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Corruption and the Primacy of Politics

Corruption and the Primacy of Politics

Chapter:
(p.223) Chapter 6 Corruption and the Primacy of Politics
Source:
Spoils of Truce
Author(s):

Reinoud Leenders

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801451003.003.0006

This book has shown how political corruption permeated Lebanon's bureaucratic institutions throughout the post-Ta'if period. It has analyzed incidences of corruption in their immediate institutional and political contexts by focusing on the institutions' bureaucratic organization and the underlying politics of their evolution. The book concludes with a summary of its findings, first by discussing how political settlement contributed to the failure of public institutions in postwar Lebanon to meet the criteria of bureaucratic organization. It then considers why the central bank was spared from the bickering of political elites and describes the Lebanese state as a state of muhasasa, or an allotment state. It also presents some key Lebanese voices on the subject of corruption and explains why Lebanon's attempts at administrative reform to combat corruption have been widely regarded as a failure. Finally, the book assesses the implications of its findings for the comparative study of postwar recovery.

Keywords:   political corruption, Lebanon, bureaucratic institutions, bureaucratic organization, political settlement, central bank, political elites, muhasasa, administrative reform, allotment state

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