Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Project PlowshareThe Peaceful Use of Nuclear Explosives in Cold War America$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Scott Kaufman

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780801451256

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801451256.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM Cornell University Press SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.cornell.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Cornell University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in Cornell for personal use. date: 24 September 2021

Dead as a Doornail

Dead as a Doornail

Chapter:
(p.196) 9 Dead as a Doornail
Source:
Project Plowshare
Author(s):

Scott Kaufman

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801451256.003.0009

This chapter looks at how the United States became dependent on imported oil, half of which came from Middle East. This was an issue since the Soviet Union maintained close ties with Arab countries and might try to manipulate their oil export policies. In addition, Arab nations implemented an embargo on oil exports to three nations, including the United States. Yet, even without an embargo, the possibility of Americans' ever increasing demand for fuel threatened to diminish US reserves, thus raising prices. The question was whether it was possible to increase those reserves, which might simultaneously curb dependence on foreign energy sources. In response, Senator Clifford Hansen suggested using the Plowshare program. By proving that Plowshare was safe, utilitarian, and legal, its proponents might finally convince the government to stop cutting funding for it.

Keywords:   imported oil, Middle East, Arab nations, embargo, US reserves, foreign energy sources, Senator Clifford Hansen, Plowshare

Cornell Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.