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Emperor of the WorldCharlemagne and the Construction of Imperial Authority, 800-1229$
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Anne A. Latowsky

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780801451485

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801451485.001.0001

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Epilogue

Epilogue

The Remains of Charlemagne

Chapter:
(p.251) Epilogue
Source:
Emperor of the World
Author(s):

Anne A. Latowsky

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801451485.003.0008

This epilogue describes Frederick II's coronation as the king of the Romans at Aachen, a center of Hohenstaufen support in a German realm. Soon after the ceremony, the young king was inspired to take up the cross in the name of aid to the Holy Land. Soon after this pronouncement Frederick presided over the translation of the remains of his ancestor Charlemagne. The coincidence of Frederick's first crusading vow and his translation of Charlemagne's remains supports the notion that the German emperors saw Charlemagne as a model crusader. David Abulafia frames the events surrounding the translation in terms of Hohenstaufen crusading dreams, claiming that the emperor had been avowed in his determination to be a new Charlemagne who was “a model emperor.”

Keywords:   Frederick II, Aachen, Hohenstaufen, Holy Land, model crusader, David Abulafia, translatio

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