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Making Money in Sixteenth-Century FranceCurrency, Culture, and the State$
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Jotham Parsons

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780801451591

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801451591.001.0001

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The Cour des Monnaies

The Cour des Monnaies

Chapter:
(p.17) Chapter 1 The Cour des Monnaies
Source:
Making Money in Sixteenth-Century France
Author(s):

Jotham Parsons

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801451591.003.0002

This chapter examines the institutional structure of control over coinage and precious metals in France in the second half of the sixteenth century. Though coinage was overseen by the royal council, which made most executive decisions, day-to-day control was vested in the Cour des Monnaies. This court administered, audited, and disciplined the mints and their workers, regulated goldsmiths and other craftsmen in precious metals, enforced laws against tampering with the coinage, and advised the royal council on policy. Particularly under King Henri II, it increased substantially in size, power, and prestige, weathering a number of attacks and scandals, and its members remained individually and collectively influential into the seventeenth century.

Keywords:   Cour des Monnaies, coinage, precious metals, royal council, King Henri II

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