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Capital as Will and ImaginationSchumpeter's Guide to the Postwar Japanese Miracle$
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Mark Metzler

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780801451799

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801451799.001.0001

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Interlude (Deflation)

Interlude (Deflation)

Chapter:
(p.109) 7 Interlude (Deflation)
Source:
Capital as Will and Imagination
Author(s):

Mark Metzler

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801451799.003.0008

This chapter focuses on the credit restriction program that was imposed under U.S. orders and directed by American Bankers Association president Joseph M. Dodge in 1949. Dodge launched this program immediately on his arrival to Tokyo in February 1949, enforcing a “one-stroke” stabilization plan that ended government price subsidies and ended lending by the Reconstruction Finance However, Dodge's restriction of credit did not end the Japanese government's policy of subsidized priority investment. Rather, it displaced it into private banking channels, which Dodge left unregulated. This set in place the final piece of the integrated state-bank mechanism that would form the financial core of the High-Speed Growth system. The sources and control of capital thus assumed the distinctive forms of the classical age of Japanese capitalism.

Keywords:   Joseph M. Dodge, credit restriction, economic policy, finance policy, government price subsidies, lending, Japanese capitalism

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