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A Union ForeverThe Irish Question and U.S. Foreign Relations in the Victorian Age$
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David Sim

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780801451843

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801451843.001.0001

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Toward Home Rule

Toward Home Rule

From the Fenians to Parnell’s Ascendancy

Chapter:
(p.129) Chapter 5 Toward Home Rule
Source:
A Union Forever
Author(s):

David Sim

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801451843.003.0006

This chapter examines how Charles Stewart Parnell, an Irish nationalist politician, sought to make his name as a transatlantic leader of the home rule campaign and head of the Irish National Land League. In the early 1880s, there was a significant struggle over the direction of Irish nationalism between those who would privilege a global campaign against land monopoly and those who would focus directly on a national struggle and were blind to arguments against the unfairness of private ownership. Moreover, historian Mike Sewell argues that during the 1880s, “Irish nationalism overlapped with domestic radicalism” and thus jarred with the conservative drift of U.S. politics. Ultimately, Parnell and the Irish National League repudiated social radicalism in favor of constitutional nationalism and economic conservatism.

Keywords:   Charles Stewart Parnell, home rule campaign, Irish National Land League, Irish nationalism, land monopoly, social radicalism, constitutional nationalism, economic conservatism

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