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State ErosionUnlootable Resources and Unruly Elites in Central Asia$
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Lawrence P. Markowitz

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780801451874

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801451874.001.0001

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Tajikistan’s Fractious State

Tajikistan’s Fractious State

Chapter:
(p.77) 4 Tajikistan’s Fractious State
Source:
State Erosion
Author(s):

Lawrence P. Markowitz

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801451874.003.0005

This chapter pursues a microcomparative study of the makeup of state security apparatuses in two regions across Tajikistan. These regions—Khatlon Province and Rasht Valley—exemplify how resource structure and patronage have embedded different state security outcomes within the country's territorial apparatus. The study reveals the inner struggles of Tajikistan's postwar reconstruction, in which the regime's use of patronage to control “unruly” local elites has been stymied by elites' limited access to rents, perpetuating an internally divided, fractious state. Initially, the formula for stabilizing and ruling Tajikistan after civil war entailed ceding control over state security institutions to key personalities and nominally absorbing smaller militia forces into various ministries of the national government. Over time, however, Tajikistan's fractious state apparatus has remained dependent on the co-optation of elites in some areas and locked in conflict with disaffected elites and nonstate militia forces in others.

Keywords:   Tajikistan, state security apparatus, Khatlon Province, Rasht Valley, resource structure, patronage, postwar reconstruction, local elites, rent, Tajikistan civil war

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