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Fault LinesViews across Haiti's Divide$
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Beverly Bell

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780801452123

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801452123.001.0001

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Social Fault Lines

Social Fault Lines

Class and Catastrophe

Chapter:
(p.118) 14 Social Fault Lines
Source:
Fault Lines
Author(s):

Beverly Bell

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801452123.003.0015

This chapter examines the social fault lines caused by the Haitian earthquake. Haiti sits directly over a major fault system made up of multiple faults, one or more of which slipped on January 12, 2010. Equally disastrous over time has been the socioeconomic fault line. People of every class and skin shade lost loved ones, homes, businesses, and personal treasures as a result of the earthquake. The earthquake's impact was as sharply delineated by class as the nation itself was, with the degree of harm, whether physical or economic, roughly paralleling income. The poor had no means through which to recover their losses, especially those on which they had depended for income; their personal catastrophes only cascaded with time. This chapter comments on the perpetuation of inequality and worsening of poverty in Haiti after the earthquake.

Keywords:   earthquake, Haiti, class, income, poor, inequality, poverty

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