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Fault LinesViews across Haiti's Divide$
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Beverly Bell

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780801452123

Published to Cornell Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.7591/cornell/9780801452123.001.0001

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Epilogue

Epilogue

Bringing It Back Home

Chapter:
(p.201) Epilogue
Source:
Fault Lines
Author(s):

Beverly Bell

Publisher:
Cornell University Press
DOI:10.7591/cornell/9780801452123.003.0027

This epilogue discusses the fate of three individuals who have figured prominently in the efforts of social movements to improve the plight of Haitians after the earthquake: Tibebe, who still lives in poverty but has “been inspired” with a flood of poetry; Suze, a women's rights advocate who constantly answers 911-type calls from women like Tibebe; and Djab, a community organizer who is involved with the Toussaint Louverture Front. The chapter argues that Haitians will remain trapped regardless of the changes brought about by social movements as long as the rules of global political and economic power persist. It emphasizes the need for close collaboration between peoples from Haiti and other countries in order to have the chance to create another world and disprove Margaret Thatcher's claim that “there is no alternative.”

Keywords:   social movements, earthquake, poverty, poetry, women's rights, Toussaint Louverture Front

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